TEL:

07757 984266

Bad Company Gym – Review

www.badcompany.co.uk

Bad Company Gym just off York Road in Leeds was founded in 1993. It has since become one of the biggest and most successful gyms in the UK, winning numerous awards along the way.

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Muay Thai Unleashed 6

Muay Thai Unleashed VI

Saturday 2nd July at 2017
13:00-18:00

Casey’s Cordingley Hall, Wellington Road, Telford TF2 8AW

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Kickboxer – Vengeance Film (Odeon Lincoln)

Kickboxer_Vengeance

You may have heard that there is a remake of KICKBOXER the movie… which is actually little to do with kickboxing – it’s more Muay Thai!!

30th September 2016 – Evening

1st October 2016 – Evening

Odeon_Lincoln

We have been asked by the Odeon Cinema in Lincoln if we would do a Muay Thai Display in the foyer for the opening nights of the film!

Kickboxer_Vengeance

We are thinking of doing a mixture of Pad Work, Sparring & Muay boran. We would allocate our students time slots to come along and take part. We are looking for males, females and children boxers of all levels of experience to take part in display. This is a fantastic opportunity to promote our club and our amazing martial art!!

Let us know me know if you are interested by emailing us by August 31st 2016: sales@lincolnthaiboxing.co.uk

Or any questions, please ask below…

Kickboxer_Vengeance

Smelly Gloves?

Smelly Gloves

Smelly Gloves

TOP TIPS

  1. Don’t leave in your bag
  2. Put in well-ventilated area
  3. Use an anti-bacterial spray
  4. Newspaper to absorb sweat
  5. Fabric softener sheet
  6. Smells nice again!!

…………………………..

HERE’S HOW!!

1. Don’t leave in your bag

Your hot, dark, damp, sweaty training bag is the perfect breeding for bacteria. If you just leave your gloves in your bag after each training or sparring session, you’ll find your gloves smell more and more. If you do nothing else, take them out of your bag when you get home.

2. Put in well-ventilated area

This can be in a utility room, garage, shed or conservatory with decent air circulation. Mesh bags can be great for carrying your gear that can be used to hang your stuff to dry it out. The main thing is that the gloves need to be completely dried out so the bacteria has no moisture in which to breed.

3. Use an anti-bacterial spray

Before hanging your gloves to dry, you can help kill the bacteria by using an anti-bacterial Febreeze spray or something similar.

4. Newspaper to absorb sweat

Add a few sheets of screwed up newspaper into each glove, this will help take out all the sweat and moisture out of the gloves.

5. Fabric softener sheet

Best tip of all… buy some cheap fabric softener sheets! Put them in the gloves around the newspaper to start to get rid of the smells. Then when your going to use the gloves again, rub the sheets around the inside of the gloves for extra freshness.

6. Smells nice again!!

Your boxing gloves are one of those things that tend to start smelling really bad over time, especially if you work hard! They are a massive breeding ground for bacteria and over time it can get really bad, so bad that other students will avoid sparring with you!! So don’t be that Muay Thai Fighter… follow the above and everyone will still love you!!!

The Art of Muay Thai Pad Work

How NOT to Use Thai Pads…

The Art of Muay Thai Pad Work

One of my favorite parts of training has always been working on the Thai pads. It’s a great way to sharpen your skills, build up your cardio, and develop the relationship between coach and teammates. My greatest pet peeve is when you are working with a partner who doesn’t know how to properly hold the pads. You could have a world champion in front of you, but put them with someone who doesn’t know how to hold pads and they will look like a beginner. 

While on the pads, it’s important to flow with your partner and develop a cadence appropriate to their level of skill and conditioning. This can easily be observed when watching a fighter and their trainer practice. It can be an amazing sight to witness. The coach gradually warms up the fighter, then starts to increase the intensity and difficulty level of holding patterns as the rounds progress. Learning to hold the Thai pads properly allows you to develop important coaching skills that will only benefit you as your level of fluency in the art increases.

Below are several tips that will help you learn how to effectively hold the Thai pads. 

1. Keep it Simple

If you are new to holding pads, keep the combinations and strikes simple. Even if you are working with someone more advanced they will not benefit from advanced holding patterns that you don’t really know. Muay Thai is a simple art and pad holding should reflect that. Single strikes will help your partner much more than long, drawn out, complex combinations. Start with what you know and slowly link everything together as you get more comfortable holding.

2. Simulate the Intended Target

Always keep in mind that when holding pads you are simulating the role of your partner’s opponent. Pad holding has to mirror the intended targets one would normally strike at. If you are holding for a body kick, keep the pads right next to your ribs. If it’s a jab-cross, the pads should be right next to your face. By holding the pads in unrealistic places you end up training your partner for targets that aren’t real. You also subject yourself to possible injury. Just remember that when you hold it is your job to get the pads in the way of the oncoming strike. If your partner throws a kick to the ribs and your pads are way out in front of you, you’re eating that kick full force. Take it from me, it’s not a nice feeling.

3. Apply Pressure at the Point of Contact

Applying pressure at the point of contact is crucial to holding pads. It ensures that your partner gets a good workout, but it also prevents you, the holder, from getting injured. For example, if your partner is throwing a hook and you receive it with a relaxed arm, you’re going to tweak your elbow and possibly strain your shoulder. When the strike reaches the pads, tense your body and meet the strike with force. That being said, never reach for the strike, allow it to come to you. Reaching for the strike is sure way to get kicked in the ribs or punched in the face. Keep in mind that your partner is aiming for you not the pads. A great way of acclimating to holding pads is to start slow and light. Tell your partner to start off hitting lightly and slowly increase the power and speed. By the end of the first round you’ll both be adjusted to each other and can start crushing it.

4. Make it Real

As mentioned above, always remember that when holding pads, you assume the role of the opponent. Try to simulate a sparring session when holding pads but always remember to work at the level of your partner. Move around and throw strikes at your partner during the session. Doing this will benefit both parties. The holder observes the openings and flaws in the striker’s game, and the striker increases his defense and reaction time. Making a pad work session “real” will only help in building up the level of skill for both individuals.

5. Don’t Over-coach Your Partner

My second greatest pet peeve is when my partner tries to coach or correct me on every little movement I perform. It’s infuriating and a tremendous waste of training time. While on the pads you are supposed to be working and improving, not having a five-minute debate concerning the position of my left foot. Coaching tips and cues should be quick and to the point. People are going to make mistakes when doing any type of sport. Just do your best to deal with them in the most time efficient manner while working on the pads.  Everyone has a unique style of learning, so remember that some people will not get it right away. If your partner is doing something incorrect try to correct them a couple of times. If the problem persists, move on and address the issue later in the session. If your partner still can’t make the necessary corrections, notify your coach and have him or her deal with the problem.

Source: breakingmuscle.com

Kwai – Muay Thai Interclub

Kwai – Muay Thai Interclub

10th August 2013

Kwai - Muay Thai Interclub

Weigh in: 11am  First fight starts at: 12pm  Finishes: 5pm  Fighters: 60

All interclubs are regulated and there are no decisions on the fights. This enables the fighter to practice his technique and gain experience in the ring. There is a referee and timekeeper present throughout the fights.

  • Each fighter will receive a certificate and trophy.
  • Everyone is welcome to support on the day.
  • Instructors; please forward fighters details 1 week before the event and bring your own protective equipment.
  • Admission £TBC for fighters and spectators.
  • Refreshments available.

We look forward to seeing on the day…

Chao Phraya Academy – Competing Fighters

  • Jack Choi
  • Trevor Gibbs
  • Darren Sullivan
  • Paul Stafford
  • Sam Hyde
  • Sam Tweed

Wanderlust Logo (Colour)

PHOTOGRAPHY: Photo’s on the day, will be taken by www.wanderlustfilms.co.uk

TRAVEL: Meeting at the Chao Phraya Academy at 09:00am on the day.
ADDRESS: Broad Leas Centre, Broad Leas, St Ives, Cambridgeshire PE27 5QB


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