Tag Archives: Paul Stafford

Kickboxer – Vengeance Film (Odeon Lincoln)

Kickboxer_Vengeance

You may have heard that there is a remake of KICKBOXER the movie… which is actually little to do with kickboxing – it’s more Muay Thai!!

30th September 2016 – Evening

1st October 2016 – Evening

Odeon_Lincoln

We have been asked by the Odeon Cinema in Lincoln if we would do a Muay Thai Display in the foyer for the opening nights of the film!

Kickboxer_Vengeance

We are thinking of doing a mixture of Pad Work, Sparring & Muay boran. We would allocate our students time slots to come along and take part. We are looking for males, females and children boxers of all levels of experience to take part in display. This is a fantastic opportunity to promote our club and our amazing martial art!!

Let us know me know if you are interested by emailing us by August 31st 2016: sales@lincolnthaiboxing.co.uk

Or any questions, please ask below…

Kickboxer_Vengeance

Smelly Gloves?

Smelly Gloves

Smelly Gloves

TOP TIPS

  1. Don’t leave in your bag
  2. Put in well-ventilated area
  3. Use an anti-bacterial spray
  4. Newspaper to absorb sweat
  5. Fabric softener sheet
  6. Smells nice again!!

…………………………..

HERE’S HOW!!

1. Don’t leave in your bag

Your hot, dark, damp, sweaty training bag is the perfect breeding for bacteria. If you just leave your gloves in your bag after each training or sparring session, you’ll find your gloves smell more and more. If you do nothing else, take them out of your bag when you get home.

2. Put in well-ventilated area

This can be in a utility room, garage, shed or conservatory with decent air circulation. Mesh bags can be great for carrying your gear that can be used to hang your stuff to dry it out. The main thing is that the gloves need to be completely dried out so the bacteria has no moisture in which to breed.

3. Use an anti-bacterial spray

Before hanging your gloves to dry, you can help kill the bacteria by using an anti-bacterial Febreeze spray or something similar.

4. Newspaper to absorb sweat

Add a few sheets of screwed up newspaper into each glove, this will help take out all the sweat and moisture out of the gloves.

5. Fabric softener sheet

Best tip of all… buy some cheap fabric softener sheets! Put them in the gloves around the newspaper to start to get rid of the smells. Then when your going to use the gloves again, rub the sheets around the inside of the gloves for extra freshness.

6. Smells nice again!!

Your boxing gloves are one of those things that tend to start smelling really bad over time, especially if you work hard! They are a massive breeding ground for bacteria and over time it can get really bad, so bad that other students will avoid sparring with you!! So don’t be that Muay Thai Fighter… follow the above and everyone will still love you!!!

The Art of Muay Thai Pad Work

How NOT to Use Thai Pads…

The Art of Muay Thai Pad Work

One of my favorite parts of training has always been working on the Thai pads. It’s a great way to sharpen your skills, build up your cardio, and develop the relationship between coach and teammates. My greatest pet peeve is when you are working with a partner who doesn’t know how to properly hold the pads. You could have a world champion in front of you, but put them with someone who doesn’t know how to hold pads and they will look like a beginner. 

While on the pads, it’s important to flow with your partner and develop a cadence appropriate to their level of skill and conditioning. This can easily be observed when watching a fighter and their trainer practice. It can be an amazing sight to witness. The coach gradually warms up the fighter, then starts to increase the intensity and difficulty level of holding patterns as the rounds progress. Learning to hold the Thai pads properly allows you to develop important coaching skills that will only benefit you as your level of fluency in the art increases.

Below are several tips that will help you learn how to effectively hold the Thai pads. 

1. Keep it Simple

If you are new to holding pads, keep the combinations and strikes simple. Even if you are working with someone more advanced they will not benefit from advanced holding patterns that you don’t really know. Muay Thai is a simple art and pad holding should reflect that. Single strikes will help your partner much more than long, drawn out, complex combinations. Start with what you know and slowly link everything together as you get more comfortable holding.

2. Simulate the Intended Target

Always keep in mind that when holding pads you are simulating the role of your partner’s opponent. Pad holding has to mirror the intended targets one would normally strike at. If you are holding for a body kick, keep the pads right next to your ribs. If it’s a jab-cross, the pads should be right next to your face. By holding the pads in unrealistic places you end up training your partner for targets that aren’t real. You also subject yourself to possible injury. Just remember that when you hold it is your job to get the pads in the way of the oncoming strike. If your partner throws a kick to the ribs and your pads are way out in front of you, you’re eating that kick full force. Take it from me, it’s not a nice feeling.

3. Apply Pressure at the Point of Contact

Applying pressure at the point of contact is crucial to holding pads. It ensures that your partner gets a good workout, but it also prevents you, the holder, from getting injured. For example, if your partner is throwing a hook and you receive it with a relaxed arm, you’re going to tweak your elbow and possibly strain your shoulder. When the strike reaches the pads, tense your body and meet the strike with force. That being said, never reach for the strike, allow it to come to you. Reaching for the strike is sure way to get kicked in the ribs or punched in the face. Keep in mind that your partner is aiming for you not the pads. A great way of acclimating to holding pads is to start slow and light. Tell your partner to start off hitting lightly and slowly increase the power and speed. By the end of the first round you’ll both be adjusted to each other and can start crushing it.

4. Make it Real

As mentioned above, always remember that when holding pads, you assume the role of the opponent. Try to simulate a sparring session when holding pads but always remember to work at the level of your partner. Move around and throw strikes at your partner during the session. Doing this will benefit both parties. The holder observes the openings and flaws in the striker’s game, and the striker increases his defense and reaction time. Making a pad work session “real” will only help in building up the level of skill for both individuals.

5. Don’t Over-coach Your Partner

My second greatest pet peeve is when my partner tries to coach or correct me on every little movement I perform. It’s infuriating and a tremendous waste of training time. While on the pads you are supposed to be working and improving, not having a five-minute debate concerning the position of my left foot. Coaching tips and cues should be quick and to the point. People are going to make mistakes when doing any type of sport. Just do your best to deal with them in the most time efficient manner while working on the pads.  Everyone has a unique style of learning, so remember that some people will not get it right away. If your partner is doing something incorrect try to correct them a couple of times. If the problem persists, move on and address the issue later in the session. If your partner still can’t make the necessary corrections, notify your coach and have him or her deal with the problem.

Source: breakingmuscle.com

Kwai – Muay Thai Interclub

Kwai – Muay Thai Interclub

10th August 2013

Kwai - Muay Thai Interclub

Weigh in: 11am  First fight starts at: 12pm  Finishes: 5pm  Fighters: 60

All interclubs are regulated and there are no decisions on the fights. This enables the fighter to practice his technique and gain experience in the ring. There is a referee and timekeeper present throughout the fights.

  • Each fighter will receive a certificate and trophy.
  • Everyone is welcome to support on the day.
  • Instructors; please forward fighters details 1 week before the event and bring your own protective equipment.
  • Admission £TBC for fighters and spectators.
  • Refreshments available.

We look forward to seeing on the day…

Chao Phraya Academy – Competing Fighters

  • Jack Choi
  • Trevor Gibbs
  • Darren Sullivan
  • Paul Stafford
  • Sam Hyde
  • Sam Tweed

Wanderlust Logo (Colour)

PHOTOGRAPHY: Photo’s on the day, will be taken by www.wanderlustfilms.co.uk

TRAVEL: Meeting at the Chao Phraya Academy at 09:00am on the day.
ADDRESS: Broad Leas Centre, Broad Leas, St Ives, Cambridgeshire PE27 5QB


View Larger Map

Khrob Kru & Grading Ceremonies

Khrob Kru Ceremony

STEVEN JOHNS – 8th Khan

Kru Steven Johns Kru Steven Johns Kru Steven Johns Kru Steven Johns Kru Steven Johns Kru Steven Johns Kru Steven Johns

Just returned from Chao Phraya Lincoln after attending the Khrob Kru (teacherr) ceremony for Steven Johns. Since our humble beginnings 13 years ago Chao Phraya has only previously awarded 3 Kru grades: Kru Leigh Edlin, Kru James Khan & Kru Samir Hidalgo. The grade is not given away and has to be earned through many years of dedication, loyalty and hard work. So it was a great honour for me to watch the first person who I graded as Kru Leigh Edlin, to be giving his first Kru grading to his student. This is a very personal and significant ceremony between Kru (teacher) and Nak Rian (student). Congratulations Kru Steven Johns you are now a part of Chao Phraya Muay Thai’s heritage.

Kru Shaun Boland

Kru Steven JohnsPictured: Kru Leigh Edlin, Kru Steven Johns & Senior Kru Shaun Boland

Assistant Instructor Ceremony

BRIAN PAWSEY – 7th Khan

Brian Pawsey
Pictured: Kru Leigh Edlin, Asst. Kru Brian Pawsey & Senior Kru Shaun Boland

Gradings

KARL KENNEDY – 5th Khan
DAZ SULLIVAN – 2nd Khan
PAUL STAFFORD – 2nd Khan
SEAN O’MEARA – 2nd Khan
TREVOR GIBBS – 2nd Khan
JAMES COHEN – 2nd Khan
SAM HYDE – 1st Khan

Photography by www.trevorgibbs.co.uk

Learn to be broken

Learn to be broken…

Breaking a fighter.
It’s a phrase you hear often in Muay Thai Boxing but what does it really mean?

Recently in sparring, I had a chance to think about this. I’d like to be all tough and say it was on my mind because my incredible dominating style broke my opponent’s will. But nope, it was me.
I broke…

I’ve only been at it for nearly a year now, and while I’m certainly not any sort of dangerous talent, I feel like I know my way around a little at this point.

After the end of training, we started our usual sparring session. By my third partner, one of which I hasten to add was our Kru Leigh Edlin. I was absolutely cream-crackered (knackered). There are reasons for this – I had been sick and been away on holiday so missed a few weeks of training – but the main reason is I’m still not at my best possible shape YET!. This has happened to me before – and I’m afraid, it’s the side effect of being a part time trainer. The thing is, in Muay Thai, when I’m tired I have enough strength that I can mostly still survive. I sort of know what I’m doing, and can deal with a more fit opponent while minimizing damage.

As I was trapped in a corner of the ring, when it came to me… this person is too good, too strong, too talented. And the the big one: I can’t stop him/her. That moment? That’s breaking – the realisation that you can not win!!

Of course, it’s not actually a “realisation” because that implies that it’s a verifiable fact. It’s not. You may not be winning now, and it may be quite difficult to win, but you can. And yet in the heat of the moment, it becomes a fact, and that’s what makes it so insidious and so dangerous.

From there, I bottled out from some sparring rounds but slogged through the last few minutes, and went home. And here’s where I was faced with a tough question – what now? Where do I go from here? I’ll admit, there was a large part of me that wanted to quit and be done. I’m in my very late 30s, never going to really fight (well maybe 😉 – how much further do I want to go with this?

But the next week, I dragged myself to the club. And you know what? It was excellent. I was back in my comfort zone, I felt good, I felt like I could do it. The moment of breaking will pass!!

But has it? Because it’s easy to feel confident when you are in your comfort zone. The real question about braking is what you do when someone pushes you out of that zone. And so far, that has not happened to me since… but it will?! And how will I respond the next time?

That’s a question I can’t answer. I can only hope that my experience will make me stronger for the next time. Maybe it will. Or maybe being broken is like being knocked out – the more it happens, the easier it is to happen again. I hope it’s the former, but fear it’s the latter. Time will tell. And either way, I will continually learn from my Kru & Club Members…

Many Thanks again to Leigh for helping me settle into the club and many thanks to all the club members, who have made me feel so welcome and have got me addicted to Muay Thai.!

Staffy

Cheers
Paul Stafford @Paul_Stafford
Chao Phraya Academy Member

I’d also like this opportunity to wish our Kru Leigh Edlin
in his forthcoming ISKA European Title Fight on Saturday 13th April More Info & Tickets HERE

Chok Dee Kru!!!