Tag Archives: Thailand

The Diet of a Muay Thai Fighter

The Basic Approach

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Training and fighting in Thailand is a full time job. Fighters will typically train in the morning and evening with a total of up to 6 hours per day and taking only one rest day each week. Because there is short breaks between training sessions, schedule fighters feeding times for optimal recovery and performance.

Below is what a typical day of training and eating:

  • AM Training – Drink water with BCAA (branch chain amino acid).
  • Post training am – Immediately after training, drink a post workout shake containing 25g protein, around 50g carbohydrates, and 15g fats.
  • Breakfast – Within 1 hour, consume a meal with around 25g protein, 50-100g carbohydrates, 15g fats.
  • During the day – In times of low activity, consume meals that are high in protein (50g), higher in fats (30g), while lower in carbohydrates (around 50g and mostly from vegetables).
  • Pre training – If feeling low on energy pre-training, eat some fruit. Around 50g or 1 piece.
  • During training – Drink water with BCAA (branch chain amino acid).
  • Post training pm – Immediately after training, drink a post workout shake containing 25g protein and around 50g carbohydrates.
  • Finish eating between 8-10pm – Main meal of the day is to be eaten around 1 hour after training. This meal should be high protein (50g), higher in carbs (100g) and lower in fats (15g)
  • Extra meal: If your feeling hungry in the few hours before bed, he had the go-ahead to consume a protein rich snack like a 2 egg omelet or a protein shake.

The Calories

Working out calories for high performance “weight classed” athletes can be tricky. Training 5-6 hours per day puts a huge amount of stress on the body and demands a high food intake to supply your body with enough energy to handle the workload, recovery, rebuilding the body etc. At the same time you need to be careful calories are not too high that you won’t lose weight. Finding that sweet spot between sufficient energy and weight loss is an individual thing and something that requires individual experimentation.

Devide the 2300kcals into 2 high carbohydrate meals which were eaten after training, 1 lower carb meal which was eaten during the day in times of low activity, and 2 super nutritious shakes to be consumed right after training.

In total have 3 different menu’s covering baseline menu for standard training day which is 2300kcals, 3300kcals on refeed days, and 2286kcals on rest days with lower carbs and higher fats.

Regular Re-Feed Days

The human body is so smart and especially good at adapting. A good example of this is how after around 14 days of being in a calorie deficit, your body realizes it’s not getting enough food and will down regulate your metabolic rate, and slows or shuts down non-essential functions like hormone and reproductive function.

To avoid this happening, we scheduled re-feed days. Every 4-7 days, we increased your calorie intake x 1.5, and not more than x 3. So if you were on 2000kcals, you would bump it up to 3000kcals.

Similar to what’s commonly known as a cheat day, however cheat days are usually for other reasons like diet sustainability. Where’s re feeds are for the purpose of stoking the metabolic fire. This sounds counter intuitive to increase calories when trying to lose weight, but research demonstrates this will avoid metabolic adaption.

The Supplements

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Although supplements are not 100% necessary for weight loss, they do help. Athletes like Muay Thai fighters who have short rest periods between training need all the help they can get to assist recovery and training performance. But forget “fat burners” and pre workout supplements, below is a basic list of highly researched supplements we use that have proven to be safe and effective.

  • BCAA’s are taken during training – in water. This is to minimize muscle breakdown while on a low calorie diet and helps with the recovery process.
  • Greens supplements are a heavily researched supplement that have proven to alkalize the body in times of rapid fat losses. This was taken 1-2 times daily in a shake.
  • Amino/carbs workout drink is taken when training exceeds 1 hour. This is a mix of carbohydrates and amino acids supply the body with everything needed start the recovery process and minimize stress.
  • Multi vitamin is taken twice daily after each training session. This is to replace lost vitamins and minerals lost during heavy sweating in training.
  • Fish oil is taken at the rate of 1g per % of body fat for the first 4 weeks, then dropped to half that amount. Many studies confirm supplementing with fish oil will inhibit the production of fat cells.
  • Whey protein supplement twice daily and immediately after training. . Usually combined with fruit, almond milk, coconut milk or water, coconut oil, greens.

Water Cutting Strategy

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I know this is the part of the cut your all waiting to hear about: How to cut 9kgs (19.8lbs) in 8 days. There are some crucial steps which we used to manipulate our fighters bodies to rapidly lose water.

Carbohydrates

In fight week, to assist with our weight loss we adjusted his carbohydrate intake to around 50-100g per day. That’s around 2 cupped handful of brown rice each day, or 2-3 pieces of fruit. We never go below 50g of carbs each day. The 50g of carbs intake each day is predominantly for supplying the liver and brain with much needed glucose, not for running a marathon. When fighters ignore this rule they end up crashing hard in the final days of the cut.

Salt

As sodium binds to water in the body, temporarily cutting salt from the diet you will cause you to lose water. In the days leading up to the weigh, our fighters avoided all salt and high sodium foods.

Natural diuretics

When using rapid weight cutting techniques, we assist the excretion of urine by using a natural diuretic. In our diets we use diuretics like dandelion root and uva ursi leaf which are both safe and nothing like the harsh drug version diuretics.

Water loading strategy

This method involves increased water intake for short periods of time which leads to increase in urinary fluid losses for several days. Essentially a fighter will increase water, and then reduce each day until intake is zero by weigh in day.

Sauna

We finished off the last of the cut with a couple of short sauna session. Our fighters are  able to lose the last 1.5kgs (3.3lbs) in a 20-30 min sitting. On the day of weigh in, we had the option of using the sauna if needed to make weight.

The Results

Our fighters can loose 1.5kgs (3.3lbs) of body fat in 3 weeks, then cut 9kgs (19.8lbs) of water weight during fight week. Then after he successfully weighed in at 72.5kgs (159.5), he followed a specific rapid recovery plan to bounce back up to 81.5kgs (179.5lbs) in less than 24 hours. The recovery process is arguably the most important part of weight cutting in combat sports.

10 Reasons Why Muay Thai Is The Perfect Martial Art

Developed over hundreds of years, the ancient martial art of Muay Thai is known for its tremendous power, maximum efficiency, and raw simplicity. Often referred to as the “Art of Eight Limbs”, Muay Thai utilizes a beautiful symphony of kicks, punches, knees, and elbows with fluidity and grace.

Muay Thai is now one of the most well-known and practiced martial arts in the world. It has proven to be effective, which is why it is most common striking base in the vastly popular, fast growing sport of mixed martial arts.

We give you 10 reasons why Muay Thai is the perfect martial art:

1) It is widely recognized as the most effective striking art in the world.

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Muay Thai is by far the most effective striking art in the world. Muay Thai has been tested in competition and real-life situations for hundreds of years, refining the art to be as fast, efficient, and powerful as it can be. On top of that, its consistent testing in combat between highly skilled practitioners has developed every aspect of the art to an extremely high level.

2) It is effective in all ranges of standup fighting.

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Muay Thai is a martial art and combat sport unlike any other. The art incorporates the use of knees, elbows, shins and hands. This allows the practitioner to use all the weapons available to the human body in kicking range, punching range, and the clinch, making it effective in all ranges of standup fighting unlike most other striking based martial arts.

3) It is simple and easy to learn.

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While there are hundreds of different techniques in Muay Thai, it is also a martial art known for it’s raw simplicity. That’s why Muay Thai is for everyone: men, women and children alike. In Thailand, it is actually more common for practitioners to start as young as five or six years old.

4) It is highly effective for self-defense.

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Muay Thai is also one of the few martial arts in the world that has been undeniably battle-tested and street certified for real-life encounters. Although widely regarded as a striking based martial art, Muay Thai also contains throwing techniques, locks, using of an opponent’s own momentum, and even submissions. The conditioning of mind, body and spirit involved in Muay Thai also gives practitioners the confidence needed for real-life self defense situations.

5) It is both an aerobic and anaerobic workout.

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Muay thai is specifically designed to promote the level of fitness and toughness required for ring competition even for recreational practitioners. With running, jumping rope and shadowboxing it provides an aerobic workout to prepare you for more intense workouts. Muay Thai also builds great anaerobic endurance with exercises like punching and kicking on the pads or bags, and clinching to work your body to its limits. This makes Muay Thai not just a perfect martial art, but also a very effective form of exercise. With continued training, Muay Thai will vastly improve your strength, dexterity, and cardiovascular performance.

6) It burns over 1,000 calories an hour.

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Nothing spells perfect more than a martial art with the ability to help you burn 1,000 calories an hour. Muay Thai is the standard of a perfect total body workout. It is a fun and efficient way to burn fat and lose weight that also builds your core, flexibility and overall strength.

7) It toughens your mind, body, and spirit. 

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The art of Muay Thai toughens your mind, body, and spirit. As the late great Muay Thai Grandmaster Kru Yodtong Senanan once said, “Muay Thai is good for your confidence and inner strength.” On top of enhancing your physical conditioning, Muay Thai builds confidence and promotes discipline of the mind through the control of emotions and feelings.

8) It is one of the key foundations for the sport of MMA.

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As the most effective striking martial art in the world, it is no wonder why Muay Thai has become one of the key foundations of the vastly popular, fast growing sport of mixed martial arts (MMA). Some of MMA’s greatest fighters and champions use the art of Muay Thai as their main striking base.

9) It will unleash your human potential in all areas of life

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One of the biggest misinterpretations of Muay Thai is that it is just a sport of violence. But like many martial arts, Muay thai also cultivates important values that are rooted in rich tradition. It has the power to humble, discipline, and also inspire, which is arguably the most important aspect of any martial art. Muay Thai instills in its practitioners many great qualities including courage, humility and warrior spirit. These qualities will no doubt help you unleash your greatest potential in all areas of life.

10) Beneficial and Enriching…

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To sum it all up, Muay Thai is beneficial for just about anyone. But remember, it is also up to the practitioner to make learning this perfect martial art even more enjoyable and enriching.

If your interested in joining us, please email Leigh at: kruleigh@lincolnthaiboxing.co.uk or ring: 07757 984266.

Our Adult training classes are here > Adult Classes
Our Kids training classes are here > Kids Classes

Some info sourced from: www.evolve-mma.com

How do Muay Thai Fighters earn in Thailand?

If you study of Muay Thai, chances are you do it for the love and not the money. More than likely you’ve heard since day one… “This sport isn’t about becoming rich.” But still, most Muay Thai fighters are struggling to get that break, to land the fight that will put them on the map to finally score a big day payday.

But how much is that payday exactly? In MMA, we see great champions are making huge amounts of cash and even huger sponsorship deals. More than likely, those at the top of the sport are at least earning in the six figure range, sometimes more. So how do these contracts compare to a top of the line Muay Thai fighter, holding a belt in the prestigious Lumpinee or Rajadamnern stadiums?

A current Lumpinee champion makes roughly 60,000 baht per fight (Around £1,200) Only after the gym takes their cut of profits, fighters are typically left with around 20,000 baht for themselves (£400). Doesn’t seem fair or much does it?!

There are ways for Thai fighters to earn significantly more money through gym bets. You might have seen certain fights advertised as having a 1,000,000 baht prize placed on them. These are usually large bets put on particular fights for gym owners to make an extra bit of money if they feel like their guy has a significant advantage going in. If a fighter invests his own money into the bet, it’s possible that he will receive a cut of the earnings. Of course, this is a very dangerous game. Losing means sacrificing an already minuscule paycheck, and perhaps being forced to fight more frequently to make up the difference.

Despite Thailand being a land where the cost of living is much lower than much of the western world, £400 per fight is still not very much money, especially at the highest possible level of the sport. Not only that, but the 60,000 baht pay day is only for top of the line competitors that have already established names for themselves.

Fighters that aren’t champions usually receive somewhere between 10 and 15,000 baht (£200 – £300). It can vary depending on how much interest there is for a fight, betting, and other factors, but typically the price range stays within those two numbers.

For farang (foreign) fighters, the paydays are much less. A foreign fighter will earn between 2 and 5,000 baht per fight if they are competing at Lumpinee stadium. This comes out to less than £100 per match-up.

There is more demand for farangs in the outlying markets, like Phuket and Koh Samui. Foreigners can make significantly more in Bangla than anywhere else, because that’s what the gamblers and audience come to see.

The real market for Muay Thai lies outside Thailand. International fighters can often earn more than double what Lumpinee champions pull in, despite the quality of competition being much lower. It is not incredibly difficult for a decent Thai to make over 100,000 baht per fight. It’s also much easier for farang fighters to come by competition their own weight, at a price that allows them to live above the poverty line.

Because of the low pay for Thai boxing within Thailand, many former Lumpinee or Rajadamnern champions end up in demeaning or ill-fitting jobs after their careers are over. There is not enough money saved up to retire comfortably, nor do they have many skillsets beyond the scope of muay thai. To make a living, skilled nak muays absolutely must take up a coaching position. Finding a teaching position inside the country is difficult, considering the market is already flooded with extremely high level trainers. Going international is an option, but many former fighters don’t want to be away from their friends and families for extended periods of time.

Right now, gamblers in muay thai are making huge amounts of money off the fighters, who are seeing very little of it for their efforts. We can only hope that the future sees either a change in the wages for some of the greatest athletes in combat sports, or newer organizations give stadium fighters the amount of money we all know they are worth.

Pornsanae Sitmonchai Retires

Muay Thai Legend Pornsanae Sitmonchai Retires

Life After Fighting:

When Pornsanae Sitmonchai stepped into the ring in Bangkok’s Omnoi Stadium last Valentine’s Day, not even the owner of his gym knew he intended it to be his last fight. The Sitmonchai team prepped him backstage, wrapped his hands and rubbed him with oil. Pornsanae, normally exuberant and outgoing, pulled into himself and concentrated on the battle ahead.

It was a high-stakes fight; he was defending his Omnoi title. He freely admits he’s afraid of losing every time he steps into the ring, “but this fight was different,” he said. “It was even worse because I knew it was my last.” It was a lot of pressure, and he was bearing it mostly alone.

He’d been on the fence for weeks about retiring, hadn’t even fully decided to retire until a few days before the Omnoi match. About a week before the fight, he approached his close friend and fellow fighter Jun (Thepnimit Sitmonchai), and told him about his plan to retire. He asked Jun not to tell P’ Ae, the gym’s owner. Jun agreed to keep quiet. He and Pornsanae had grown up together, training and living alongside one another at Sitmonchai for the past nearly 20 years. For the few days leading up to the fight, Jun and a handful of Pornsanae’s other closest friends at Sitmonchai were the only ones who knew this fight would be his last.

None of Pornsanae’s friends was surprised to hear he wanted to retire. At age 34, Pornsanae has amassed around 300 fights and a reputation for a wildly entertaining, aggressive, unrelenting fighting style. With that style, however, comes the danger of injury, especially the cumulative effects of knockouts and concussions.

Recently married and now with a young family, Pornsanae had been questioning his decision to keep fighting since his daughter was born nearly two years ago. In the ring, his aggressive tactics suggested fearlessness. Outside the ring, however, he worried about the effects such a career might have on his health. “When I was younger,” he said, “I was never afraid of anything. But now that I have a family, I’m afraid I’ll die soon if I keep fighting.” His interactions with other pro fighters, mostly Western-style boxers, gave him pause. “You can tell when you talk to these boxers that most of them don’t function at a hundred percent anymore. It scares me that someday I might become like that.”

The first sign of trouble happened during a plane flight in early 2013. Pornsanae had just lost a fight by decision to Michael “Tomahawk” Thompson in Australia. It was a full-rules, caged Muay Thai show in which the fighters wore MMA gloves, far smaller than the gloves Pornsanae had been using in his 20-year career.

On the plane home from Australia, Pornsanae’s head started aching. This was unusual for him, and he worried about what it signified. Thompson hadn’t knocked him out, but Pornsanae had been given two standing eight-counts during the three rounds. Once back in Bangkok, he hurried to the hospital.

He told the doctors he’d been fighting since he was 11 years old—more than 20 years of shots to the head. The doctors understood his career as a Muay Thai fighter meant he had to continue fighting to support his family. They told him to keep coming back for regular checkups, gave him pills they said would increase blood flow to his brain.

Pornsanae’s fans and fight critics were taking notice. Comments and blog posts started showing up, calling for him to retire, alleging that Sitmonchai Gym was forcing him to fight. In Thailand, however, it’s not always a straightforward transition from earning a living as a fighter to earning one as a trainer, or any other job. Hundreds of high-level Muay Thai boxers retire every year, often with no certain method to support themselves. Some fighters become trainers; many do not. Motorcycle taxi stands and fruit stalls are populated with former fighters trying to get by.

Like many other fighters approaching the end of their career, Pornsanae felt the pressure. “You get to a point where you can’t fight, so you have to find some new experiences, do something else. I can’t be a boxer forever, and I have to find other ways to make money. Most of all, I have to think about my family.”

“People were analyzing his knockouts and fighting style, talking about his life and what he should do, without actually talking to him to see what his wants and needs were,” said Abigail McCullough, foreign liaison of Sitmonchai and a resident of the gym for the past five years. “They have no idea what his life is like. I was getting pissed off at these people who were writing about Pornsanae’s life from their positions of privilege, espousing to know what’s best for him. It’s creepy moral arrogance. It’s all well and good to say he should be retiring, but are you going to pay for his kid’s food? If you’ve been here [in Thailand] any length of time, you know these fighters fight for survival. It’s how they provide for themselves and their families. Other people’s values, all the critics saying he needs to retire from fighting, it doesn’t apply in his world. Everyone knows he’s getting old and that he needs to stop fighting. But this is the current state of Muay Thai. It’s changing all the time, and now luckily these retired fighters are finally getting better options for their post-fight careers. But the transition is not always easy.”

When he stepped into the Omnoi ring for the last fight of his career, Pornsanae wasn’t thinking about what he’d do after fighting. He told himself this was it, his last fight, so put in one hundred percent. He wanted to leave a legacy, what he called “a beautiful history.”

From the red corner, Pornsanae squared off against his opponent, Petch GL Suit. The fight lasted only two rounds. Pornsanae knocked Petch down with an elbow in the second round. Petch jumped back to his feet quickly but shakily, received a count from the ref. Looking to end it before Petch could fully recover, Pornsanae pushed forward, fired a sharp low kick, stepped in and leveled Petch with his punches.

Petch collapsed onto his back. The ref waved it off, fight over. Pornsanae raised his hands and danced around the ring, leaped onto the neutral corner and faced the cheering gamblers in the stands, mouth agape in the half-crazed ecstasy of knowing he did it, he retired as a champion, an old fighter at 34 and now permanently a legend in Muay Thai.

Back in the dressing room after the fight, Pornsanae broke the news to gym owner P’ Ae that he was officially retiring from fighting. P’ Ae and Pornsanae had grown up sharing a room; they were like brothers. Keeping the secret from him had been hard. Pornsanae apologized for not telling P’ Ae sooner, saying it would have been too stressful before such an important fight. P’ Ae was understanding, and completely supportive of his decision to retire.

Pornsanae was relieved to let his secret out to everyone at the gym. Making the decision to retire and then keeping it from his fight family had been an emotional burden. “He was afraid even to tell me,” said Abigail, Jun’s partner and close friend of Pornsanae. “But the truth is, we all wanted him to retire. We wanted him to take care of himself, didn’t want his health to suffer. He himself had said a few times that he was getting too old.”

According to Abigail, one of the biggest hurdles to Pornsanae’s retirement was money. “He didn’t have anything that would pay as well as his fighting career so we all knew he was inclined to keep fighting. He has a new family so of course he wants to make as much money as he can while he still can.”

What prompted Pornsanae to hang up his gloves once and for all was a call from Evolve MMA in Singapore, a highly regarded gym famous for its coaching staff of retired champions. The day after Pornsanae’s Omnoi fight, Evolve MMA announced he would soon be joining their team as a trainer.

In his 23-year career, Pornsanae has seen the sport of Muay Thai go from being nearly exclusively Thai to internationally famous. This foreign interest in Muay Thai is providing him a smooth path from famous fighter to highly sought trainer. Pornsanae, who was born into a poor family in rural Kanchanaburi Province, will be making a base salary of approximately 100,000 baht a month (about $3,100), not counting additional private lessons. He’ll potentially make more in a month than many of his countrymen make in a year. Not bad for a high school dropout who grew up fighting for a living.

Pornsanae is scheduled to depart Thailand in March 2015. He plans to work the next few years in Singapore, taking a break every four months to visit his family in Thailand. Working as a fighter and now a trainer abroad present challenges to his family, but both the financial and emotional stability of his family are paramount to him. “When I was growing up,” he said, “my parents were never very warm and we were not very close. Now that I have my own family, I want to give them the warmth I didn’t have growing up. Unfortunately while I was fighting, I had to be very focused and disciplined, so I didn’t have much time for my family. Now I’m going away to Singapore, which is necessary because I have to provide for my family, but I plan to come home as often as I can, and have them come visit me too.”

Knowing the kind of person Pornsanae is, some of his gym friends have started making bets as to how long he’ll last at his new job. “Some of us think he won’t last more than a few months away,” Abigail said. “He’s such a homebody! He hates being away from home.”

The high salary and good working environment are appealing to Pornsanae, but what he’s most looking forward to about Singapore, he says, is being so close to Universal Studios. “I can’t wait to bring my family there. I’ve been to a lot of countries, but Singapore is my favorite because Universal Studios is right there and I can go all the time now.

“I won’t stay in Singapore forever, though,” he said. “I’m doing this to earn money for my family, and we will ultimately stay in Thailand. Kanchanaburi is my home; Sitmonchai is my home. I will always come back here.”

Source: www.fightland.vice.com

The World’s top Muay Thai Camps

Muay Thai is the national sport of Thailand, but it has become a global phenomenon with camps operating all over the world. A few Western fighters have started to make a name for themselves on the international scene. Even only a decade ago, it was almost unheard of for a foreign fighter to possess the skills good enough to win a title at Lumpinee Stadium or Rajdamnern Stadium. Thanks to trailblazing pioneers such as Rob Kaman and Ramon Dekkers in the 1980s, Muay Thai is now a global sport. While the Thais still dominate the game at the highest levels of Muay Thai in the world, the sport’s popularity has ignited across the globe.

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Thailand remains the heartland of the sport and no country can come close in terms of the quantity of elite level competitors which The Kingdom continually churns out. An estimated 5,000 professional Muay Thai camps are spread all over Thailand and are situated in virtually every town. Children start at a very young age such as 5-6 years old and Muay Thai is even taught in schools. In any given year, there are an estimated 250,000 to 300,000 elite professional Muay Thai fighters competing around the country. Only the very best 500 fighters or so in Thailand make it to the big stadiums like Lumpinee or Rajdamnern in Bangkok. And still, most fighters end up failing in the big leagues. The numbers are even worse for foreigners in terms of odds for success.  For this reason, it is no surprise that most of the top camps are in Thailand, but there are some notable exceptions due to widespread proliferation of Muay Thai knowledge.

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Here is a list of the world’s top Muay Thai destinations for authentic Muay Thai.

Evolve MMA

The Thai media in Thailand have crowned Evolve MMA’s Muay Thai instructor team as the greatest dream team of legends in history.  Evolve MMA in Singapore has the most decorated team of Muay Thai trainers found anywhere in the world, including camps in Thailand. It currently includes big-name legends of the sport like Namsaknoi Yudthagarngamtorn, Attachai Fairtex, Orono Wor Petchpun, and Nonthachai Sit O as well as an vast array of multiple-time Rajadamnern and Lumpinee champions including Muangfalek Kiatvichian, Chalee Sor Chaitamin, Saenghiran Lookbanyai and Dejdamrong Sor Amnuaysirichok, Singmanee Kaewsamrit, Chaowalith JockeyGym, and many others. It also houses many champion trainers from Sityodtong Camp.

Evolve MMA offers Muay Thai classes in Singapore for the complete beginner to the advanced Lumpinee-level professional fighter. If you are looking to learn Muay Thai in Singapore, Evolve MMA is arguably one of the best Muay Thai gyms in the world. If you are looking to compete and win in Lumpinee Stadium, Evolve MMA is worth a visit to sharpen your skills against some of the best in history.

Petchyindee

The Petchyindee gym has been one of the best in Thailand for several decades and a brand new location is currently under construction featuring state-of-the-art facilities. It will include accommodation for tourists. Historically, Petchyindee has not open to the general public, but it will be next year. It is already home to the Petchyindee stable of fighters which includes two of the best fighters of the decade in Sam-A Kaiyanghadao and Nong-O Kaiyanghadao while training is overseen by multiple time Lumpinee and Rajadmanern champion Sagat Petyindee.

Petchyindee also throws co-promotions at Lumpinee Stadium on a regular basis with their star fighters. Their fighters are well-known for their technical mastery of Muay Thai and are well-known as cardio machines. When it opens its door to foreign tourists, it is well worth a visit to see how one of the best camps in Thailand trains its legendary champions.

Sitsongpeenong

Sitsongpeenong is a camp that caters to Westerners with air conditioned, indoor facilities. However, do not be fooled by the luxurious settings. It has a world-class fight team which currently includes multiple-time tournament and title winner Kem Sitsongpeenong, current Thailand champion Sittichai Sitsongpeenong and former Lumpinee champion Thongchai Sitsongpeenong. It is a serious camp with serious Muay Thai. Fighters at Sitsongpeenong are known as very well-rounded with strong kicks and excellent punching power, a rarity in the world of Muay Thai. If you want to learn authentic Muay Thai, Sitsongpeenong is definitely one of the best.

There are facilities in both Bangkok and Phuket, catering to students of all levels and Sitsongpeenong regularly sends fighters to compete at all the main stadiums in Thailand with many of them highly ranked in their respective weight classes.

Singpatong

Despite being located on the outskirts of Phuket’s most notorious red light district, Singpatong has an excellent reputation and has helped launch the careers of top Thai and Western fighters with Pentai Sitnumnoi, Peneak Sitnumnoi and Damien Alamos all winning Lumpinee titles in recent years. Peneak was the 2011 ‘Fighter of the Year’ and the head coach, Numnoi Singpatong, has a crop of up and coming Thai youngsters coming through as well as being extremely open to Western fighters who want to come and train. The open atmosphere of this camp makes it a place to visit for the beginner and the serious fighter. Singpatong training is classic Thai-style with lots of roadwork, heavy bags, pads, and clinch work. Cardio is strongly emphasized at Singpatong.  You can learn excellent basics as well as advanced technique at Singpatong.

Sitmonchai

Located on the outskirts of Kanchanaburi, this Muay Thai camp is in a remote location, but is known for its laid-back atmosphere. However it is still home to some feared and respected fighters like Pornsaneh Sitmonchai, who has a reputation as being the most exciting Muay Thai contenders in Thailand today, and teenage prodigy Yodkhunpol Sitmonchai who recently secured a contract with international kickboxing organization Glory. Due to its remote location, the training is very spartan and hard. Roadwork is heavily emphasized with endless rounds of pad work and conditioning. The trainers at Sitmonchai have decades of experience at Lumpinee and Rajdamnern stadiums.  Do not expect special treatment as a visitor. The training is as tough as they come. If you want an immersive Muay Thai experience, Sitmonchai is one of the places to go.

Jitti Gym

Jitti Gym in Bangkok is owned by the well respected Jitti Tanongsak and while it isn’t known for producing Thai fighters it has helped launch the careers of some of the top Westerners in the sport including WBC and WMC champion Liam Harrison. Known for its family atmosphere, Jitti Gym is also home to Andy Thrasher who became the first ever non Thai to win a Toyota Marathon in 2011 and is welcoming to complete beginners as well as seasoned pros with basic accommodation available.

Tiger Muay Thai

Tiger Muay Thai is best known as a tourist destination for those who want a combination of training and fun on the beautiful island of Phuket.  The Muay Thai classes cater to students of all levels and the trainers include former Lumpinee champion Rattanachai Jadngooluem and former Rajadamnern champion Lamsongkram Chuwattana. It also has a very serious MMA program with elite competitors and instructors such as Roger Huerta and Brian Ebersole.

13 Coins

Attached to a large hotel in Bangkok, 13 Coins is run by the eccentric Mr Coke and is home to several top fighters with former ‘Fighter of the Year’ winners Saenchai PKSaenchaigym and Saengmanee Sor Tienpo both training here as well as Pakorn Sakyotin and western boxers like Kwanoichit 13coinsexpress and Pungluang Sor Singyu.

Lanna

Lanna Boxing Camp, better known in Thailand as “Kiat Busaba”, is a professional boxing camp in Thailand’s northern capital city of Chiang Mai. Owned and managed as a family concern,we have worked hard over several years together with our young Thai boxers to achieve success at the top level of competition as well as being considered one of the best Northern Muay Thai Training centres. In the pleasant surroundings of our camp, as we train everyday, we offer the opportunity for people to train professionally and gain insight and understanding of the ancient art of Muay Thai.

… and of course

Chao Phraya Muay Thai 😉

Chao Pyraya (Lincoln) in Lincoln is run by the well respected Kru Leigh Edlin and while it isn’t very known as yet for producing professional fighters, it has a fantastic atmosphere and superb training and facilities. It is Chao Phraya Muay Thai Academy’s aim to introduce and promote the art of Muay Thai, Thai Culture & History within our class structure and syllabus. In addition, the academy aims to promote fitness, confidence and well being through our exercise and training prescription, welcoming to complete beginners as well as seasoned professionals.

Sourced from: www.sg.sports.yahoo.com

Buakaw v Kehl Scandal

K-1 MAX 2014 Final – Buakaw v Kehl

Buakaw Banchamek vs Enriko Kehl

Organisers of scandal-tainted K-1 Max wait to hear from Buakaw

On Sunday morning (October 12), a message posted on Banchamek Gym’s Facebook page said: “I apologise for making my supporters puzzled. You’ll soon understand me.”

Organizers of the scandal-tainted K-1 Max mixed-martial arts tournament are waiting to hear from two-time champ Sombat “Buakaw” Banchamek before deciding whether to sue him for walking out of Saturday’s…

Buakaw v Kehl

Muay Thai superstar Sombat “Buakaw” Banchamek battles WBC third-ranked Enriko Kehl of Germany in Saturday’s K-1 Max Final in Pattaya. Buakaw forfeited the bout when he refused to appear for a fourth deciding…

Buakaw, 31, forfeited Saturday night’s fight in Pattaya when he disappeared without explanation from the ring following the third of three scheduled rounds. Despite Buakaw widely seen as having the fight against World Boxing Council third-ranked Enriko Kehl of Germany, judges ruled the bout a draw and ordered a fourth “sudden death” round.

By then, Buakaw had left Eastern National Indoor Sports Stadium and was disqualified. By forfeiting, the missed the opportunity to become the first three-time K-1 Max champion and the 22-year-old German was crowned the new champ in the 70-kilogramme division amid boos and jeers from the crowd.

Mr Kurarc said the K-1 team was surprised by Buakaw’s disappearance and did not know the reason why he left.

“We want to hear from Buakaw the real reason he left and thoroughly investigate the case, so there is no legal action at the moment,” he said. “We will wait for Buakaw to contact us. Otherwise we will try to contact his manager.”

The Thai fighter, who has not spoken to the media, has scheduled a press conference for Tuesday afternoon at his Banchamek Gym. In the meantime, a message regarding the controversy was posted posted to the Banchamek Gym Facebook page.

“Buakaw refused to return to the K-1 ring because the rules had been changed just a few hours before the fight,” the statement claimed. It added that the changed rules banned one of Buakaw’s signature in an attempt to make the fight – in which the Thai fighter was favoured heavily – more even.

Buakaw’s gym claimed the rule change was made due to the influence of international online-gambling websites.

“There was an effort to make the fight more even because the stakes were high,” the statement said. “K-1 isn’t a legal sport and there’s not one professional sport organisation in Thailand that authorises from (South Korea) to hold it here. How did the foreign mafia come and organise worldwide sports betting in Thailand? Who should take responsible for this?”

Originally scheduled for July 26, but delayed due to the May 22 military coup, the K-1 finals were being held for the first time in Thailand. It is run by the private K-1 organisation, which hosts fights similar to Muay Thai boxing. However, the bouts use different rules and point systems and fewer moves are allowed, leading aficionados to call K-1 a “watered down” version of Thai boxing.

Buakaw won the title in 2004 and 2008. The two previously fought at Max World Champions, held in Khon Kaen on Dec 10. The Thai fighter won by unanimous decision.

Mr Kurarc insisted the rules of Saturday’s fight were the same used since Buakaw won his first title in 2004. By walking out of the bout, the Thai fighter breached his contract with K-1 Global Holdings, which Mr Kurarc said runs through September next year. He said Buakaw was paid in full Sept 22.

K-1 has seen its standing among fight fans drop precipitously in recent years amid allegations of widespread match-fixing. According to Thai media reports, Buakaw forfeited the fight the final also was “rigged.”

The fighter reportedly went to a police station last Tuesday to file a complaint about online gambling in connection with the upcoming finals.

K-1 MAX 2014 Final : Buakaw Banchamek vs Enriko Kehl

Source: www.bangkokpost.com

Muay thai legend Buakaw breaks silence on walkout

baukaw v khel

K-1 fighter suggests rule changes overshadowed his title fight

Controversial fighter Buakaw Banchamek yesterday defended his decision to walk out of his title fight on Saturday, saying he preferred to let the audience decide the bout’s outcome rather than the judges.

The 32-year-old’s latest antics stunned viewers when he abruptly left the ring after the regulation three-round bout against Germany’s Enriko Kehl for the K-1 under-70kg championship ended in a draw.

As a result of his vanishing act, the German was handed the title, to the bewilderment of the crowd at the Indoor Athletic Gymnasium in Pattaya.

On Monday, organisers K-1 Global Holdings told a press conference that they were hoping to hold talks to clear the air with the two-time champion, before deciding whether or not to sue the Thai for breach of contract.

Buakaw, no stranger to controversy, publicly commented on the incident for the first time yesterday when he met the media at his Banchamek gym, stressing several times that he did not want the judges to rule on the outcome of the controversial bout.

“I don’t want the [judges’] verdict on the bout. I wanted the audience to decide it for themselves. I prefer not to let the officials judge me.

“It was my own decision [not to continue the fight]. My manager and my team knew nothing about it. I did what I believed my fans and supporters would understand,” said Buakaw.

The Surin native, who made his debut in the muay thai K-1 code a decade ago, insisted he had no intention of breaching his contract and was grateful to a sport that had catapulted him to fame.

Deliberately breaching the contract “never crossed my mind. I’m fully committed to the contract. They had my respect because people knew me from K-1.”

The Thai boxer hinted at feeling unease with a change of rules prior to Saturday’s fight, saying he had no choice but to abide by it.

“I accepted the rules set by the K-1 committee. They spoke in English but I’m not sure whether my translation was correct or not.

“Since I began fighting in K-1 in 2004, they have banned the use of the elbow but allowed the fighters to use the knee. I knocked out a Japanese opponent with my knee before I went on to win the championship in my first year in sport.

“Then they changed the rules, placing restrictions on the use of the knee. They let a boxer hold his opponent before landing the knee just once per fight. More than that could result in disqualification.

“I knew there was a management change in the K-1 organisation. I’m not sure whether that had something to do with the sudden change in the rules or not.

“I have no idea whether the rule changes were made in order to improve the standard or for a different purpose. Officials asked me during the pre-fight briefing whether I had any questions. I just waved my hands to signal ‘no’. I was looking to box as usual.”

Buakaw did open the door for talks with K-1 officials to find a solution to the walkout. He said he would look at whether he still had a contract with K-1 before starting any talks.

Source: www.nationmultimedia.com

Muay Thai – Stop fighting in the last round?!

“Why do they stop fighting and just walk around in the last round?”

Those of you who have been to see a fight in Thailand or have watched one on the internet will notice they often fight a little different to how we do in the west.

Muay Thai last round

To a lot of people this could seem very pointless and in the west could potentially put people off coming to the shows. They have after all paid to see a fight and want to see both parties giving it their all.

However, this isn’t a western sport remember and over the years gambling has played a huge part in how the game is played in Thailand.

More often than not the first two rounds are a feeling out process, so not much really happens. Also on some occasions the boxers are told to take it steady as they are trying to get the betting in the favour of their opponent, making the odds better for themselves.

Round three is generally where the fight will really begin and both boxers are really trying to take the advantage.

The fourth as I’ve always been told is the unofficial money round. If you can win this big then the fight is yours.

Now we come to the round in question.

If the fight has been very close in the third and fourth then the fifth will be fought at the same intensity as the last two rounds.

However, if one boxer is clearly in the lead then he will be told to stay back from his opponent so as to not let the victory slip out of his hands.

This advice will come from his corner and from the gamblers who have money on him to win. This can become very annoying when you’re trying to listen to your corner and you have random people coming up and shouting at you in a language that you barely understand.

His opponent will possibly try and go for him for about the first minute of the round; if he has no success then he will back off.

Often at this point the boxer in the lead will offer his glove to his opponent, asking him to acknowledge defeat.

Here you will usually get the losing boxer accepting defeat and not going for broke to try and change the fight around. While the winning boxer knowing he has won agrees not to beat up on his opponent anymore.

This is a very different mind set to fighters in the west; over here the losing boxer will still fight until the bitter end as a knockout could change everything. Likewise, the winning boxer will still be trying to KO his opponent even though he is already sure of his victory.

To be honest the gambling is slowly killing Muay Thai in Thailand as the gamblers have so much power now in the big stadiums.

If you have watched many of the videos that I have posted up from what is classed as the golden era of Muay Thai (90’s) you will have noticed how packed the stadiums were back then.

Nowadays it is rare that you will see the likes of Lumpinee or Rajadamnern filled to that capacity because of how the game is so heavily influenced.

Out in the provinces though, Muay Thai is still popular with big crowds coming to watch and enjoying the fights. Muay Thai is also growing around the rest of the world with the standard getting better all of the time and so many fighters spending long stints in Thailand.

Source: www.damientrainor.com

21 Signs You’ve Spent Too Much Time In Thailand

Well technically, you could never, ever spend too much time in Thailand. The country is chock-full of intricate temples, pristine islands, and mysterious caverns.

Here’s how to tell if you’re turning the corner from Thai tourist to Thai local.

1. You prefer motorbikes to minivans. In Thailand, you don’t have soccer moms: you have fearless and intrepid moto-moms who fit their entire families (babies included!) onto one gas-powered bike. No seatbelts? No problem. Continue reading

Human Weapon

History_channel_logo

Hosts Jason Chambers and Bill Duff travel to Bangkok, Thailand, the home of one of the most recognized martial arts, Muay Thai. Their journey takes them to the legendary Lumpinee Stadium, and then to the jungles bordering Burma where they train at a Buddhist temple.

Human Weapon – Muay Thai

Muay Thai Elbow

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Kru Leigh’s – Thailand Trip (01.11.13)

Kru Leigh Edlin, Paul Kirk & Luke Brooks – Thailand Trip

Story to follow…

Stepping out for Chao Phraya Muay Thai on Monday 11th November, Leigh Edlin will be fighting against a Thai opponent in Chiang Mai Thailand.

11th November 2013
Leigh Edlin (Lanna Muay Thai) v Cheulong (Chaiyang)
At the Liokroh Boxing Stadium (Chiang Mai)

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Pictures so far!

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From Kru Shaun Boland

For my Nak Rian, Nak Muay and friend…

Stepping out for Chao Phraya Muay Thai on Monday 11th November, Leigh Edlin will be fighting against a Thai opponent in Chiang Mai Thailand.

Leigh’s current record stands at 15 fights with a total of 13 wins (10 by KO) 1 loss 1 draw. He holds WMTO Midlands area, IKF English, IKF British, ISKA British, ISKA Commonwealth & ISKA European title belts and has fought Thai nationals twice before in Thailand winning both by KO.

Leigh has been my student, Fighter, senior instructor (For Chao Phraya & Chao Phraya Lincoln) and friend for over 11 years now and we have journeyed together through our training and passion, not just for Muay Thai , but in Thai History, culture and Buddhism.

As his teacher I am honoured and proud to have him as a student and as his friend I am equally honoured. I personally wish him Chok Dee (Good luck) for this fight (it is only the second time out of 15 that I have not been by his side for a fight).

I have written this and put up the photographs of our journey together so far, may we be blessed and continue our journey for many more years – With respect and heart felt love.

Fight off flab at Thai boxing camps

Tubby tourists fight off flab at Thai boxing camps.

In a sweltering training camp on a tropical Thai island, sweaty tourists wearing oversized gloves and baggy shorts slam their fists, knees, elbows and feet into a row of heavy bags.

Welcome to the latest craze in extreme fitness — Muay Thai boxing.

Muay-Thai-Fight-the-flab2

With worries growing about bulging waistlines, many foreigners are flocking to Thailand to spend their holidays not on the beach, but in a humid gym to follow a punishing regime of training in Muay Thai and other martial arts.

Some are going to even more extreme lengths, quitting their jobs to spend weeks or months training in an effort to win their long battles with obesity or hone their skills in the hope of becoming professional fighters.

Jordan Henderson, 26, left behind his London lifestyle of long work days, parties and overeating after the doctors warned him that he faced looming heart problems due to his nearly 184-kg weight.

After a month at a training camp in Phuket off the Andaman Coast, he had shed about 20 kg.

“You’re in an environment where it’s hot all the time, surrounded by people doing fitness,” he said after an early morning workout. “It’s about taking yourself out of the box that you live in and just focusing on one thing, and that’s to train and lose weight.”

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The first few days were far from easy.

“It was horrible — the heat and the training, the aches you get and the dramatic diet change,” Henderson said.

“I’ve gone from eating whatever I liked to grilled chicken, steamed vegetables and brown rice — hungry for weeks,” he added.

But despite the gruelling regime, he never considered packing his bags and leaving early.

The art of eight limbs

Thailand is home to a flourishing Muay Thai training industry that welcomes thousands of guests every year, thanks in part to the popularity of mixed martial arts, which combines striking and grappling techniques.

“Mixed martial arts is the fastest growing sport in the world and Muay Thai is an integral part of that,” said Will Elliot, director of Tiger Muay Thai, one of more than a dozen such training camps in Phuket.

“It’s definitely extreme to travel halfway across the world,” said Elliot, whose camp welcomes hundreds of guests each month paying up to about $100 per week for group training.

“But we’re in the tropics. It’s hot. We’re in Thailand, the birthplace of Muay Thai, so it’s about immersion,” he said.

Muay Thai, Thailand’s national sport, is known as “the art of eight limbs” because it combines punches and kicks with elbows and knee strikes.

Anyone thinking about signing up should be prepared for the challenge.

“It’s very physically intensive. At the end of a workout you’re going to be exhausted. So if you can maintain that twice a day in combination with a diet, your fitness is going to increase rapidly,” Elliot said.

It worked for James Mason, 29, a former used car salesman from Britain who weighed 200 kg when he arrived in Thailand a year and a half ago but has since shed more than 100 kg.

“The doctor told me that if I didn’t do something drastic to change my life, in five years’ time I would be dead,” he said.

“When I first got here I couldn’t walk 200 meters without my back hurting. I had to sit down and take a breath. I’d be dripping with sweat because of the heat and the humidity.”

Three months into his training in Thailand he caught a flesh-eating bacteria and required three operations, narrowly avoiding having his leg amputated.

But he recovered and returned to his regime, and recently completed a 900 km charity bike ride from Phuket to Bangkok.

Don’t forget to duck

At the Tiger camp, about 20 students from countries including Australia, Britain, Egypt and Russia sweated their way through a recent beginners’ class under the close watch of muscular former Thai professionals.

“One, two, duck, body punch,” shouted one of the instructors as the students, each at varying levels of fitness, practiced their moves.

After warm-up exercises involving jogging, stretching, star jumps and shadow boxing, the students paired up to spar, punching the air within a whisker of their opponents’ ears.

“You’re meant to duck!” one girl reminded her friend after a near miss.

The main goal of most of the trainees is not to become a boxing champion but to lose weight, said instructor Phirop Chuaikaitum, better known as Ajarn (Master) Dang.

“They run for a long time, stretching, punching in the air for a long time — that makes it easy to lose weight,” he said.

“But we don’t make it hard because they will get hurt. We do it slowly but non-stop for 2½ hours. They only have a 3-minute break.”

There is no slacking off, even for royalty.

“There was one guy who was a prince from Dubai,” Phirop said.

“He came for the beginner class. I hit him with a stick and he told me that he was from a royal family. Whether you’re a construction worker or member of a royal family, when you come for boxing training you are all equal.”

As the session neared an end, sweat dripped from the students’ foreheads and they grimaced with pain. The knock-out blow — 100 push-ups to finish — was inflicted on those who still had energy left.

“It does hurt. You’re sore everywhere. Sometimes it’s tough to walk,” Henderson said. “You’re dripping in sweat but once you get back, have a shower, a swim in the pool — you can’t buy that feeling.”

Source: www.japantimes.co.jp